The World’s Tallest Waterslide Looks as Terrifying As It Sounds


  Just how insane is the record-setting waterslide currently being erected at the Schlitterbahn Kansas City Waterpark? Let’s just say they didn’t name it Verruckt (that’s German for “insane”) for nothing.
  
  The World’s Tallest Waterslide Better End In the World’s Deepest Pool Either that or there’s going to be a lot of squished people needing to be scraped off the tiles at the deep end.
  
  Dubbed “the world’s tallest, fastest and most extreme waterslide,” the VERRUCKT MEG-A-BLASTER will reportedly “tower” over the current tallest waterslide — Brazil’s 134.5-foot tall “Insano.”
  
  Read More.

The World’s Tallest Waterslide Looks as Terrifying As It Sounds

Just how insane is the record-setting waterslide currently being erected at the Schlitterbahn Kansas City Waterpark? Let’s just say they didn’t name it Verruckt (that’s German for “insane”) for nothing.

The World’s Tallest Waterslide Better End In the World’s Deepest Pool Either that or there’s going to be a lot of squished people needing to be scraped off the tiles at the deep end.

Dubbed “the world’s tallest, fastest and most extreme waterslide,” the VERRUCKT MEG-A-BLASTER will reportedly “tower” over the current tallest waterslide — Brazil’s 134.5-foot tall “Insano.”

Read More.

Look Into the Futuristic Labs Where Satellites Are Born


  The shoot was commissioned by Audi Magazine for a feature about the British space industry, a project that took White to Astrium Ltd. and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, two satellite components makers in southern England. It’s fun to imagine that these sort of places would be strange and spare and futuristic, like scenes from 2001: A Space Odyssey. It turns out that’s not entirely inaccurate.
  
  Read More.

Look Into the Futuristic Labs Where Satellites Are Born

The shoot was commissioned by Audi Magazine for a feature about the British space industry, a project that took White to Astrium Ltd. and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, two satellite components makers in southern England. It’s fun to imagine that these sort of places would be strange and spare and futuristic, like scenes from 2001: A Space Odyssey. It turns out that’s not entirely inaccurate.

Read More.

Exploring the World Underneath New York City

In the short documentary, A Beautiful Waste, director Jon Kasbe follows Duncan on a tour of a section of the New York City sewer system. While underground they discover hidden springs, surreal landscapes, and of course some putrid water. Duncan says that his goal is to improve cities by increasing our awareness of how they function. “Understanding how cities work is important,” says Duncan, “otherwise we don’t get to shape how they develop.”